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The Antianxiety Food Solution: How The Foods You Eat Can Help You Calm Your Anxious Mind, Improve Your Mood & End Cravings

Author Last Name

Scott

Author First Name

Trudy

Second Author

Star Rating

5 Stars

Appropriate Audience (check all that apply)

Health Professional
Enthusiast
Novice

Summary & Review of Book

Written in a warm, reader-friendly style, The Antianxiety Food Solution takes the often undiscussed topic of anxiety disorders, brings them into the light, and offers solid, scientifically backed nutritional advice to help alleviate the symptoms.

Anxiety disorders encompass a wide range of conditions from generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) to panic disorder to social anxiety and more.  Often undisclosed by those who suffer from this sometimes debilitating range of disorders, anxiety can cause a wide array of physical symptoms due to the stressors, emotional toll, nutrient depletion, and the lack of proper diet.  The author herself a former sufferer of anxiety, brings the voice of experience to this topic in a caring yet straightforward way.

Diving right in to the topic, Capter 1, Figure Out Your Optimum Antianxiety Diet, gives a step-bystep approach to proper nutrition to support the bio-individual needs of those looking to, as the sub-title says, calm their anxious mind, improve their mood, and end their cravings.  As part of the nutritional support offered in the book, the author gives very clear examples of what to eat and, just as importantly, what not to eat, even including examples of nutrient dense bonus foods.  The author then takes the subject a step further by including chapters on a wide range of conditions that may affect nutritional status and promote anxiety such as allergies, addiction, blood sugar imbalances, poor digestion, brain chemistry, hormonal imbalances, and lifestyle choices.  Throughout the book are a number of easy to understand self-scoring quizzes as well as tables which concisely illuminate the points the author is making.

One main premise of the book is the promotion of a clean, traditional diet, free from chemicals and additives, that is high in whole foods.  In another significant topic, the author explains how the use of amino acids can be highly beneficial for many sufferers of anxiety disorders.  Clearly highlighting the symptoms each amino acid deficit can cause, she then illustrates how to address these deficits and discusses how to consider use of amino acids to help regulate brain chemistry.  She then looks at a little discussed condition called pyroluria, a genetically induced anxiety disorder caused by faulty hemoglobin synthesis.  As little known as this condition appears to be it is easily treated with supplemental levels of readily obtainable nutrients; all explained by the author in very plain language.

The book ends with some solid advice about lifestyle and health changes that do not rely on medication, supplements, or nutrition, but are equally important to the concept of living a balanced, happy life.  Addressing sleep, exercise and support as an important factor in recovery.

Categories (check all that apply)

Depression / Anxiety
Genetics
Gluten Intolerance / Celiac
Nutrition Counseling
Stress